Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada has appointed an Advisory Committee that is reviewing all Tentative List applications and will recommend to the Minister those properties which it believes should be included on Canada’s updated Tentative List for World Heritage Sites.

The Advisory Committee is composed of seven Canadians that collectively represent a broad base of knowledge in natural and cultural heritage conservation and commemoration in Canada:

An open, transparent, and merit-based process was used to solicit and appoint these candidates to the Ministerial Advisory Committee.

The Committee will meet on three occasions

  • April 2017: to participate in an orientation session
  • Mid-June 2017: to review all applications
  • November 2017: to decide on a final list of sites to recommend to the Minister

Biography of Committee members

Dr. Christina Cameron (Chair)

Christina Cameron is a Professor in the School of Architecture and Canada Research Chair on Built Heritage at the University of Montreal. She serves as Chair of the Advisory Committee on the Official Residences of Canada and President of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO. She worked at Parks Canada for thirty five years, including as Director General of National Historic Sites and as Secretary to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. She has been actively involved in World Heritage as Head of Delegation for Canada (1990-2008), Chairperson (1990, 2008) and Rapporteur (1989). She teaches a Masters seminar on World Heritage, and carries out related research. She has received a multitude of national and international awards for her professional and volunteer work, including an Outstanding Achievement Award (2007) from the Government of Canada, the National Trust of Canada’s Gabrielle Léger Medal for Lifetime Achievement (2014), and the Order of Canada (2014).

Guujaaw

Guujaaw had been an active participant leading up to the conservation and protection of Gwaii Haanas in the 1970s, and deeply involved in the designation of Nunstins as a “World Heritage Site”. He went on to serve as a negotiator in the drafting of the innovative Gwaii Haanas Agreement. He later served as member of the Gwaii Haanas Archipelago Management Board, setting standards in cooperative management. He has worked with many Indigenous groups throughout British Columbia and beyond in the protection of culturally and ecologically important sites. He served as President of the Haida Nation from 2000 to 2013, where he negotiated the protection of another 27% of the islands and a blueprint for reconciliation with the Provincial Crown. Guujaaw has been a carpenter, hunter, fisher and trapper and presently a carver, singer and historian.

Dr. Shabnam Inanloo Dailoo

Shabnam Inanloo Dailoo is Assistant Professor and Director of Athabasca University’s Heritage Resources Management Program. She is also Co-Chair of the National Trust for Canada’s National Roundtable on Heritage Education. She was formerly a Heritage and Community Engagement Advisor with Western Heritage Inc. Ms. Dailoo was a member of the Canadian delegation to the 32nd session of the World Heritage Committee in Québec City in 2008, and her PhD dissertation focussed on the challenges and complexities of inscribing cultural landscapes on the World Heritage List.

Mr. George Greene

George Greene is the Founding Chair of Stratos Inc., a consulting firm which provides advice on national and international conservation matters and sustainable development practice in Canada’s natural resource sectors. He is also currently a Visiting Professor with the University of Ottawa’s Institute of the Environment and an Adjunct Professor in Environmental Governance with the University of Guelph. His professional work has included both the development and review of Canadian World Heritage nominations. He served as Assistant Director General of the IUCN from 1995 to 1999, then as member of its Global Council from 2008 to 2016. He also worked at the Canadian International Development Agency for five years, including as Director General for Policy Development.

Dr. William Moss

William Moss has been Chief Archæologist for the City of Québec since 1985. He has previously worked in England, and in Québec for Parks Canada and the Québec government's Department of Culture and Communications. Projects carried out under his supervision have generated an important body of knowledge that has been widely communicated to the city's inhabitants, as well as contributing to the conservation and development of numerous archæological heritage resources. A sessional lecturer at Laval University and a regularly invited lecturer in Québec and abroad, Mr. Moss is active in several learned societies, such as the Society of Antiquaries of London, ICOMOS's International Committee on Archæological Heritage Management, and the Society for American Archæology's Committee on International Government Affairs. The Society for Historical Archæology presented him with the 'Carol V. Ruppé Distinguished Service Award' in 2016 for his longstanding contribution to the SHA, particularly in promoting its presence in the French-speaking world. Locally, he has received awards from the tourist industry for organizing international scientific conferences. Laval University awarded him an honorary Ph.D. in 2014 for his contribution to the knowledge of, the protection and the development of Québec City's archæological heritage.

Dr. Lisa Prosper

Lisa Prosper is a cultural heritage consultant, working on projects involving the development of heritage policy and the commemoration of Indigenous heritage. She served as the Director of the Willowbank School of Restoration Art’s Centre for Cultural Landscape from 2012 to 2015. She is a board member of ICOMOS Canada and a member of ICOMOS’ International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes. She presents and publishes nationally and internationally on cultural landscape theory and practice. Dr. Prosper is a member of the Mi’kmaq First Nation community.

Mr. Derek Thompson

Derek Thompson worked for the Government of British Columbia for thirty years on protected areas, environment and sustainability issues, including serving as Deputy Minister of Environment, Land and Parks for six premiers. Since his retirement from government in 2004, he has among other things served as an adjunct professor at Royal Roads University, as Special Advisor on National Parks to the federal Minister of the Environment, as teaching faculty for the Canadian Parks Council’s Parks System Leadership Course, as External Evaluator for WWF International Forests and Climate program of work, and as a consultant to the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development. He has received the Canadian Parks Council’s Merit Award (1992 and 1998), the Harkin Medal (2004) by the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, and the Queen’s Jubilee Medal (2002).