Fort Gaspareaux National Historic Site is an archaeological site located just outside Port Elgin, New Brunswick, 4.8 km from the village of Baie Verte. It is on a small point of land jutting into Baie Verte on the Northumberland Strait separating the mainland from Prince Edward Island.

The site consists of 1.23 hectares of flat coastal land on the south side of the estuary of the Gaspareaux River and is protected by a substantial sea wall. Its landscape contains archaeological traces of the French Fort Gaspareaux together with 9 graves of Provincial soldiers killed in 1756 while garrisoning the fort. The designation refers to the landscape and the remains of the French-English struggle it contains.

Getting here

Fort Moncton Road
Westmorland NB E4M 1G5

Hours of operation

Always open

Fees

Free admission
This site is self-guided.

Sites nearby

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  • Beaubassin and Fort Lawrence National Historic Sites

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  • Monument Lefebvre National Historic Site

    The Monument-Lefebvre is a 19th century heritage building where visitors experience the triumphs of the Acadians through artefacts, film, performances, and the permanent exhibit, “Reflections of a Journey – The Odyssey of the Acadian People.”

  • Port-la-Joye–Fort Amherst National Historic Site

    Established in 1720, Port-la-Joye was the entry point for European settlers coming to Île Saint-Jean to embark on a new life. There are centuries of history to discover in this historic location, declared a national historic site in 1967.

  • Fundy National Park

    The world’s highest tides await visitors at Fundy National Park. Kayak on the Bay of Fundy, explore the seafloor when the tide recedes, hike or bike through native Acadian forests and more at one of Canada’s best-known national parks.