Step into the vibrant fur trade era in the heart of Old Lachine. Pass through the doors of the 1803 stone warehouse and relive a vibrant page of history through the lives of voyageurs, the bourgeois and the Amerindians. Imagine bales of pelts, stacked crates of goods and barrels of provisions. In the air there is the distinct smell of beaver pelts - the most coveted of the furs brought out of the wilderness.

Getting here

1255 Saint-Joseph Boulevard
Lachine Borough Montréal QC H8S 2M2
Map

Hours of operation

Closed for the season
Complete schedule

Fees

Free admission in 2017. Other fees still apply.
Detailed fees list

Contact us

Telephone: 514-637-7433
Telephone (off-season): 514-283-2282
Toll-free: 1-888-773-8888
Email: information@pc.gc.ca

The fur trade: live the adventure!

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