47 location(s) found
Akami-Uapishkᵁ-KakKasuak-Mealy Mountains National Park Reserve

Located in Labrador, the glacially-rounded, bare rock summits of the Mealy Mountains reach up to 1180 meters to overlook Lake Melville. The pristine landscape of mountain tundra, marine coasts, boreal forests, islands and rivers are home to numerous boreal species. For thousands of years, ancient human cultures have also called this place home. For the Innu, Inuit, and others, the landscapes of this outstanding natural region hold great cultural significance. The traditional names of the park are Akami-uapishku, an Innu word meaning White Mountains across, and KakKasuak, a Labrador Inuit word for mountain.

Aulavik National Park

Aulavik, meaning “ place where people travel ” in Inuvialuktun, protects more than 12,000 square kilometres of arctic lowlands on the north end of Banks Island. The park encompasses a variety of landscapes from fertile river valleys to polar deserts, buttes and badlands, rolling hills, and bold seacoasts.

Auyuittuq National Park

A zig-zag skyline of craggy granite peaks and glittering glaciers overlooks tundra valleys and steep-walled fiords whose winding waterways teem with narwhal and ringed seals, Auyuittuq is a diverse and grand-scale Arctic experience. Hike alongside icy, thundering streams and amid wildflower-dotted meadows. Traverse Akshayuk Pass, a natural corridor through a landscape of towering rock - a haven for experienced mountaineers and backcountry skiers. Spot snow geese, Arctic foxes, and human-shaped Inuksuit basking in Midnight Sun.

Banff National Park


Rocky Mountain peaks, turquoise glacial lakes, a picture-perfect mountain town and village, abundant wildlife and scenic drives come together in Banff National Park - Canada’s first national park and the flagship of the nation’s park system. Over three million visitors a year make the pilgrimage to the park for a variety of activities including hiking, biking, skiing and camping in some of the world’s most breathtaking mountain scenery. Banff is part of the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Bruce Peninsula National Park

Dramatic cliffs rise from the turquoise waters of Georgian Bay. In large tracts of forest, black bears roam and rare reptiles find refuge in rocky areas and diverse wetlands. Ancient cedar trees spiral from the cliff-edge; a multitude of orchids and ferns take root in a mosaic of habitats. Welcome to the magic of Bruce Peninsula National Park.

Cape Breton Highlands National Park

One of Canada’s most enchanting places, where the mountains meet the sea.

As you hug the world-famous Cabot Trail coastline you'll wind through Cape Breton Highlands National Park, where lush, forested river canyons carve into the ancient plateau, edged by rust-coloured cliffs.

Keep your eyes open for moose and bald eagles. You might even catch a minke or pilot whale breaking waves in the Atlantic, or Gulf of St. Lawrence. And you’re never far from a steaming plate of local lobster fresh from the ocean around you.

Elk Island National Park

Spread a blanket and gaze at a starry sky undiluted by city light, or tour behind the scenes at a bison handling facility and learn how this magnificent animal was brought back from near extinction. Elk Island National Park is not only an important refuge for bison, elk and more than 250 bird species, but is also an oasis of calm for day picnickers and overnight campers alike.

Forillon National Park

Forillon National Park offers a wide range of experiences by the sea, along cliffs and in the forest. Prefer a quiet stroll across a pebble beach? Want to look into history by opening the door to a beautiful yellow house overlooking the bay? Go snorkelling and discover colourful underwater plant and wildlife. Watch seals play. Listen carefully to hear the songs of seabirds and the spouts of the whales…

Fundy National Park

Experience the world’s highest tides – not to mention pristine forests, deluxe campgrounds and a taste of Atlantic Canada culture – at Fundy National Park. Paddle in a kayak as the waters rise up to 12 metres or more. Walk the otherworldly sea floor at low tide. Or venture inland where trails lead to waterfalls deep in Acadian forests. With unique camping options – including yurts – and even regular music performances, Fundy is a Maritime treasure.

Georgian Bay Islands National Park

Welcome to the world’s largest freshwater archipelago—home to a boat-access nature preserve situated where the windswept white pines and granite shores of the Canadian Shield turn to dense deciduous woodland. Here, adventure is easy. Cycle wooded trails, overnight at secluded campsites or waterfront cabins and hike to viewpoints atop emerald shoreline. The landscape of Georgian Bay Islands National Park inspired the Group of Seven. Let it inspire you.

Glacier National Park

With exceptional alpine scenery and deep valleys filled with ancient forests, Glacier National Park is a year-round paradise. Scale its heights following trails pioneered by legendary Swiss mountain guides, take a gentle stroll amid moss-draped old-growth cedars or hike through alpine meadows strewn with lichen-covered boulders. After a day’s exploring, sink into an armchair before a roaring fire and steep yourself in the history of Rogers Pass, the final link in the railway that brought Canada together as a nation.

Grasslands National Park

Experience the solitude of the wide-open plain as the prairie wind ripples a sea of grasses beneath the clear blue sky. Ride a traditional wagon, sit before a crackling campfire or spend the night beneath a canopy of brilliant stars. Travel back in time as you gaze at dinosaur bones, wander past tipi rings and catch a glimpse of a prairie homestead on the distant horizon.

Gros Morne National Park

Soaring fjords and moody mountains tower above a diverse panorama of beaches and bogs, forests and barren cliffs. Shaped by colliding continents and grinding glaciers, Gros Morne’s ancient landscape is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Wander coastal pathways and beachcomb among sea stacks. Cruise the dramatic, sheer-walled gorge of Western Brook Pond. Spot moose and caribou. Hike to alpine highlands where Arctic hare and ptarmigan thrive on tundra, and explore the colourful culture of nearby seaside communities.

Gulf Islands National Park Reserve

Eagles and seabirds swirl in the skies above the Salish Sea, sheltered, islet-dotted waters teeming with seals, otters, orcas and pods of porpoises. Kayak, hike or cycle a lush paradise with rare eco-systems basking in a Mediterranean-like climate - the forested Gulf Islands are laced with trails leading to mountaintop viewpoints, lighthouses, and reminders of First Nations and pioneer pasts, while their shores and lagoons are a haven for thriving birdlife.

Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site

Massive moss-draped cedar and Sitka spruce tower above the Haida people’s ancient carved poles and fallen longhouses on the lush rainforest islands of Gwaii Haanas. Skies fill with bald eagles, bears scavenge salmon on wild beaches and the ocean teems with breaching whales, porpoises and sea lions. Experience a rich, remote landscape steeped in spirituality, protected by Parks Canada and the Haida who draw cultural inspiration from this land of their ancestors.

Ivvavik National Park

Ivvavik, meaning ‘a place for giving birth, a nursery,' in Inuvialuktun, the language of the Inuvialuit, is the first national park in Canada to be created as a result of an aboriginal land claim agreement. The park protects a portion of the calving grounds of the Porcupine caribou herd and represents the Northern Yukon and Mackenzie Delta natural regions.

Jasper National Park



Extending over 11,000 square kilometres, it is the largest national park in the Canadian Rockies and part of UNESCO's Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks World Heritage Site.

Find your connection to this special place by discovering one or all of our five spectacular regions, exploring our extensive trail network, visiting our famous red chair locations or participating in Parks Canada led programs and events.

The year 2017 marks Canada’s 150th birthday which means we will be celebrating all year long! With free park entry for the entire year, we welcome you and your family to visit us as often as you can! (Hint: the winter months are pretty spectacular!)

Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site

Generations of families have paddled, hiked, camped, and connected with nature and Mi’kmaw culture at Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site. When the sun sets, the skies over Kejimkujik reveal a beautiful panorama of tens of thousands of stars in Nova Scotia’s only Dark Sky Preserve. Rock engravings known as petroglyphs, traditional encampment areas, and canoe routes attest to the presence of the Mi’kmaw people for thousands of years.

Kejimujik National Park Seaside is a separate protected wilderness on the Atlantic coast where you can experience pristine white sand beaches, astounding turquoise waters, coastal bogs, abundant wildflowers, rich lagoon systems, and coastal wildlife.

Camping reservations

Kluane National Park and Reserve

Kluane – high in the mountains of southwest Yukon – is a land of extremes. The park is home to Canada’s highest peak (5,959-metre Mount Logan), its largest ice field and North America’s most genetically diverse grizzly population. Travellers from around the world come to traverse alpine passes on backcountry odysseys and raft past calving glaciers. With exceptional day hikes and highway-side scenery, Kluane awes from every angle.

Kootenay National Park


Established in 1920 as part of an agreement to build a new road across the Rockies, Kootenay National Park is a place of unique contrasts, from icy mountain rivers to steamy hot springs. Take a 60-minute scenic drive and discover a new surprise around every bend. Spend the day exploring deep canyons and tumbling waterfalls just a short stroll from the road. Or, plan a vacation traversing the park’s backcountry trails.

Kouchibouguac National Park

Discover a national park on New Brunswick’s Acadian Coast where lush mixed-wood forests lead to colourful salt marshes and warm ocean beaches. Offshore, golden sand dunes foster calm seas. At night, this Dark Sky Preserve is a celestial masterpiece; in winter, it is a snowbound fun-zone. And each of these natural wonders intertwines with fascinating Mi’kmaq and Acadian cultures. Welcome to Kouchibouguac National Park—an awe-inspiring all-season destination.

La Mauricie National Park

As well as forests of conifers and hardwoods, La Mauricie will treat you to touches of azure: the Park has more than 150 lakes of various sizes. During the day, let the haunting cry of the common loon thrill your spirit. Nearby, pools at the foot of waterfalls invite you to come for a swim. When evening falls, it's the hooting of the barred owl or the great horned owl that lulls you to sleep.

Mingan Archipelago National Park Reserve

Instantly captivating, the Mingan Archipelago features colossal limestone outcroppings that evoke landscapes from primeval times. Frolicking whales and seals enliven the vast, blue horizon, while over 1,000 islands and islets enchant visitors with their unique flora and seabird colonies. Discover this timeless natural wonder aboard a sea expedition or by exploring the many island nature trails!

Mount Revelstoke National Park

Take a cool stroll through a lush rainforest on a hot summer day. Stand at the point of no return, where champions once launched themselves down a world-famous ski jump, and imagine the thrill of flight. Climb the only mountain in the national park system that you can summit just a short walk from your car – all at Mount Revelstoke National Park.

Nahanni National Park Reserve

The Cirque of the Unclimbables’ granite spires rise out of the lush alpine meadow, at Nájljcho (Virginia Falls) the South Nahanni River surges over a drop twice the height of Niagara Falls. Nahanni National Park Reserve, encompassing 30,000 square kilometers, is a designated UNESCO world heritage site. The Dehcho First Nations welcome adventurers to Nahʔą Dehé, land of peaks, plateaus and wild rivers.

Nááts'ihch'oh National Park Reserve

Nááts'ihch'oh National Park Reserve is named after Nááts'ihch'oh the mountain – a powerful place for the people of the Sahtu. Near the Yukon-Northwest Territories border, the park is in the traditional lands of the Shúhtaot'ine (Mountain Dene), and home to grizzly bear, Dall’s sheep, mountain goats, and woodland caribou.

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

Suit up in your storm gear and watch the winter breakers crash on a rocky shoreline, or enjoy a summer stroll along an endless sandy beach. Step out of your kayak to be greeted by a First Nation Beach Keeper, or hear ancient legends told around the campfire by Guardians of the West Coast Trail. Pacific Rim National Park Reserve offers a West Coast experience steeped in nature and history.

Point Pelee National Park

At the southernmost point of the Canadian mainland - Point Pelee National Park, experience nature like never before. Each spring, view flocks of migratory birds, joined in autumn by waves of vivid Monarch butterflies. In winter, wander snowy trails past ice-cloaked trees and in summer, bask on sandy beaches. Whether you cycle, paddle or hike Canada’s smallest but most ecologically diverse national park, you’ll be immersed in an unforgettable eco-adventure.

Prince Albert National Park

Whether your idea of adventure is portaging a canoe between remote forest lakes or a day of pulse-racing waterskiing and wakeboarding, Prince Albert National Park satisfies with a mix of wilderness and accessibility.

Prince Edward Island National Park

Gentle surf strokes sandy beaches alongside red cliffs and wind-sculpted dunes. Cycle a seashore path, savour a picnic by a lighthouse and spot heron wading in coastal bays. Hike woodlands and overlook ponds watching for red fox, waterfowl and warblers, then head to one of many beaches to build spectacular sandcastles. At sunset, roast marshmallows over a campfire listening to tales and songs - Prince Edward Island National Park is a giant playground for kids of all ages.

Pukaskwa National Park

Waves roll across immense Lake Superior and crash against a remote granite shore. Tracts of windswept spruce and pine reach beyond the horizon from towering cliffs and along secluded sandy beaches. Black bears feast on blueberry bushes; haunting loon song scores sunsets; moose stilt-walk across wetlands. And the culture of the Anishinaabe First Nations connects Pukaskwa National Park’s wilderness to the powerful richness of an ancient human story.

Qausuittuq National Park

Imagine a cluster of islands in a frozen sea, a home for the endangered Peary caribou, a traditional hunting and fishing area that has sustained Inuit of Resolute Bay since the time of their relocation in the 1950’s; Qausuittuq National Park is all of that and more.

Quttinirpaaq National Park

Shimmering ice caps are punctured by jagged black peaks and massive glaciers fuel wild rivers. White Arctic hare graze amid a purple saxifrage-dotted landscape while ancient peoples’ camps and explorers’ shelters dot rugged, pristine Quttinirpaaq. The top of the world is an extreme and exhilarating experience where groups of muskoxen roam the tundra and curious caribou pass nearby in the glow of the Midnight Sun.

Riding Mountain National Park

Yellow goldenrods sway in prairie meadows and a gentle breeze blows through the aspen. Black bears pad along boreal trails and the piercing sound of elk bugling echoes around the forest. Visit Grey Owl’s historic cabin and see the enduring landmark of the East Gate. Go to sleep under canvas lulled by the sounds of night birds and wake to decide which of the 400 km of trails you’ll hike today.

Rouge National Urban Park

A rich assembly of natural, cultural and agricultural landscapes, Rouge National Urban Park is home to amazing biodiversity, some of the last remaining working farms in the Greater Toronto Area, Carolinian ecosystems, Toronto’s only campground, one of the region’s largest marshes, unspoiled beaches, amazing hiking opportunities, and human history dating back over 10,000 years, including some of Canada's oldest known Indigenous sites.

Sable Island National Park Reserve

A wild and windswept island of sand sits far out in the North Atlantic, its iconic crescent shape emerging from the expanse of the sea. Isolated and remote, Sable Island is one of Canada’s furthest offshore islands. Shifting sand dunes, among Eastern Canada’s largest, dominate the landscape. The famous Sable Island wild horses roam freely, and the world’s biggest breeding colony of grey seals lives on its extensive beaches. Freshwater ponds hint at the life-sustaining freshwater lens floating below the island. Plants, birds, and insects have adapted to life on Sable, some of which are found nowhere else on earth.

Sable Island has a long and fascinating human history which spans more than four centuries. More than 350 vessels have been wrecked due to rough seas, fog, and submerged sandbars surrounding the island, earning it the title “Graveyard of the Atlantic”. Canada’s first life-saving station, established in 1801, was built here. Sable Island is a testament to survival in an unlikely environment.

Sirmilik National Park

Amid an expansive landscape of glaciers, valleys and red-rock hoodoo spires, nesting seabirds crowd sheer sea cliffs rising from iceberg-dotted waters. Paddle among seals and floating ice, listening for the breaths of narwhal and beluga whales. Ski across glaciers. Hike where snowy owls hunt. Travel by snowmobile to the floe edge on the lookout for polar bears, ringed seals and walruses. Stop in at Inuit, Thule and European cultural sites. Visiting Sirmilik is the ultimate Arctic adventure under the Midnight Sun.

Terra Nova National Park

 

Escape. Explore. Experience… The wonder and drama of Canada’s most Easterly National Park, Terra Nova. It’s a magical place where the land and sea compete for your attention, where the island boreal forest reveals its natural and cultural secrets as you hike a trail and where you can experience an evening of theatre under the stars. This place is ready for your next adventure-make it your own!

Thousand Islands National Park

Journey to the picturesque granite islands and windswept pine trees of Thousand Islands National Park. Explore secluded bays by kayak or powerboat. Enjoy a day by the river or overnight in waterfront oTENTik accommodations at the park’s mainland visitor centre. Discover rare species of turtles and birdlife alongside undulating hiking trails. Experience the magic of this captivating and historic wilderness, just a few hours from Toronto or Montreal.

Torngat Mountains National Park

A saw-tooth skyline of jagged peaks and glacier-carved fjords plunges towards iceberg-dotted indigo waters as polar bears and caribou roam amid some of Earth’s oldest rocks. The subarctic Torngat Mountains are an Inuit homeland, a treasury of the powerful stories, spirits and traditions of centuries of travellers whose descendants welcome those wishing to join them in following ancient footsteps through a dramatic landscape where nature and culture connect.

Tuktut Nogait National Park

The landscape and wildlife of the 18,890 sq km national park is seen by those privileged few willing to travel 170 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle. The landscape features rolling hills, three major rivers, steep canyons, waterfalls, rare Bluenose west caribou and the continent’s fiercest predators.

Ukkusiksalik National Park

Polar bears, grizzlies, Arctic wolves and caribou - Ukkusiksalik’s rolling ochre hills and lush tundra thrive with wildlife, and are dotted with archeological reminders of human cultures passing for millennia through this remote wilderness. Paddle or boat an inland sea amid beluga whales and seals. Snowmobile across the frozen sea. Hike through wildflowers and in the company of stone inuksuk beneath the glow of the Midnight Sun.

Vuntut National Park

Remote and unspoiled Arctic wilderness, a First Nation’s history dating back millennia and the setting for one of the planet’s great animal migrations await the few who make the trek to Vuntut National Park.

Wapusk National Park

Let this expansive wilderness fill you with awe as you visit the remote subarctic that is Wapusk National Park. This 11,475 square kilometre park, at the transition between boreal forest and arctic tundra, protects one of the largest polar bear maternity denning areas in the world. Wapusk is located within the range of the Western Hudson Bay population of polar bears, which numbers approximately 1000 bears. Nature lovers watch for arctic foxes, arctic hares, wolves, caribou and wolverine as well as more than 200 bird species. Access to Wapusk is via authorized commercial tour operators in Churchill.

Waterton Lakes National Park

The prairies of Alberta meet the peaks of the Rocky Mountains in Waterton Lakes National Park. This beautiful landscape has been impacted by a wildfire that has resulted in most of the park being closed to the public. The Entrance Road and Waterton townsite are open, however there are limited park services available. We appreciate the public’s support and understanding as Parks Canada works to make Waterton Lakes National Park safe for future visits.

Wood Buffalo National Park

As part of Canada's system of national parks and national historic sites, Wood Buffalo National Park of Canada is our country's largest national park and one of the largest in the world. It was established in 1922 to protect the last remaining herds of bison in northern Canada. Today, it protects an outstanding and representative example of Canada's Northern Boreal Plains.

Yoho National Park

Named for a Cree expression of awe and wonder, Yoho lies on the western slopes of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Vertical rock walls, waterfalls and dizzying peaks draw visitors from around the world. With exceptional hiking and sightseeing, the park offers a unique glimpse of Canada’s natural wonders, from the secrets of ancient ocean life to the power of ice and water.